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Webinar Recording
Aug 20, 2021
Zero Trust Through Dynamic Authorization and Policy Driven Access

As workers become more mobile and workloads move into the cloud, the traditional model of enforcing security at the network perimeter becomes ineffective. A Zero Trust model of strict access control for every user or device protects your organization from advanced security threats enabling you to stay connected, productive and secure.

Event Recording
Jul 22, 2021
Panel: The Future of Access Management
Event Recording
May 27, 2021
Panel - What's Next for IAM: Building for the Future
Webinar Recording
Sep 29, 2017
Dynamic Externalized Authorization for the Evolution of the Service-Oriented Architecture - Using ABAC for APIs and Microservices

As opposed to traditional monolithic applications, a (micro)service-based architecture comprises multiple loosely coupled modules (“services”) that serve specific business purposes and communicate over lightweight network protocols. Such services can be developed, deployed and scaled independently on different platforms, which greatly reduces the time needed to bring as new product to market and allows for continuous delivery development process, where small changes to the business logic of an individual service can be quickly introduced and deployed.

However, when designing a (micro)-service architecture, dealing with identity and security becomes a much more complicated task than in traditional monolithic applications: each individual component must know which user is interacting with it and which access rights are granted to him. Externalizing and centralizing access management is a natural choice for microservices systems to ensure consistently secure and scalable authorization. Implementing the authorization service itself as a microservice, providing policy-driven access control for other microservices and APIs seems to be just as natural… Or is it?

Webinar Recording
Jun 02, 2017
(Big) Data Security: Protecting Information at the Source

With the growing adoption of cloud computing, Big Data or open APIs, managing, securing and sharing massive amounts of digital data across heterogeneous and increasingly interconnected infrastructures is becoming increasingly difficult. From file servers to relational databases and big data frameworks, to the Internet of Things and entire API ecosystems – each data model imposes its own security controls and separate technology stack for enforcing them. An alternative approach – data-centric security – is in fact nothing new and quite simple in theory: instead of managing access to each individual infrastructure, just focus on protecting the data itself, regardless of its type and location. However, practical implementations of this concept depend heavily on two things: standards and policies. A solution that manages to successfully implement them in a unified, flexible and open manner, could surely be able to bring data security to a new level.

Webinar Recording
Oct 19, 2016
The Future of Data-Centric Security

Data-centric security solutions control access via a fine-grained policy approach and focus on securing this content via dynamic and scalable authorization. The data access filtering approach signifies a new generation of database security techniques, based on a combination of two robust and proven technologies: data-centric security and standards-based Attribute Based Access Control (ABAC). On the whole, this method brings database security to a new level.

Webinar Recording
Apr 29, 2016
Enforcing Fine Grained Access Control Policies to Meet Legal Requirements
Attribute Based Access Control (ABAC) solutions provide an organization with the power to control access to protected resources via a set of policies. These policies express the increasingly complicated legal and business environments in which companies operate these days. However, due to the number of moving parts, it becomes harder to understand the effect a policy change might have in a complex policy set. These moving parts include the policies themselves, attribute values and the specific queries under consideration.