IBM to acquire CrossIdeas - further expanding its IAM/IAG portfolio

A while ago I blogged about IBM being back as a leader in the IAM/IAG (Identity Access Management/Governance) market. Today the news that IBM is to acquire CrossIdeas, an Italian vendor in the Access Governance market, hit the wire.

CrossIdeas is a key player in Access Governance in its home market, but also had some recent success in other markets, both in Europe and the U.S. The company originally started in authorization and role management. Over time, CrossIdeas – formerly known as Engiweb Security before a management-buy-out – added further capabilities. At the center of their solution today is their activity-based approach on SoD (Segregation of Duties) which relies on activities within business processes to model SoD rules. This approach allows auditors and business departments creating and editing SoD rules without specific IT knowledge.

Aside of the strength in role mining/modeling and the SoD approach (which notably provides sophisticated support for SAP environments), CrossIdeas’ product IDEAS also provides a well thought-out approach on access risk analysis and management. Furthermore, there are standard capabilities for Access Governance such as Access Recertification.

Furthermore, IDEAS provides a standard integration with IBM Security Identity Manager, which has been deployed at customers before.

From IBM’s perspective, CrossIdeas and its IDEAS product add several important capabilities to the IBM portfolio. The strength in managing SoDs from a business perspective relying on business process knowledge is one of these. Access risk management is the other. Combined with the existing integration with IBM Security Identity Manager, IDEAS can provide immediate benefit to IBM. It fits well into IBM’s strategy on IAM/IAG, enhancing IBM’s offerings for “policy-based Identity and Access Analytics”.

From KuppingerCole’s perspective, IBM is further strengthening its position in the IAM/IAG market. Being “ready-to-use” based on the existing integration, we expect to see further integration at all levels – platform technology, user interfaces, etc. – into the IBM IAM/IAG portfolio quite soon.

My final paragraph of the other blog linked at the beginning has been:

I always appreciate strong competitors in a market – it helps drive innovation, which is good for the customers. The IBM investment in IAM is also a good indicator of the relevance of the market segment itself – IAM is one of the key elements for Information Security. IBM’s strategy also aligns well with my view that IAM is just one part of what you need for Information Security. Integration beyond the core IAM capabilities is needed. So, in light of IBM’s current news around IAM, I think it is worth having a closer look at them again.
Nothing to add to this.

Related KuppingerCole Research

Leadership Compass Access Governance

Executive View IBM Security QRadar

Leadership Compass Dynamic Authorization Management

Leadership Compass Identity Provisioning

Buyer’s Guide Access Governance and Identity Provisioning

Advisory Note Access Governance Architectures

Executive View IBM Security Access Manager for Enterprise Single Sign-On

Product Report CrossIdeas IDEAS



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