Do You Need a Better IAM System to Meet the GDPR Requirements?

GDPR, the EU General Data Protection Regulation, is increasingly becoming a hot topic. That does not come as a surprise, given that the EU GDPR has a very broad scope, affecting every data controller (the one who “controls” the PII) and data processor (the one who “processes” the PII) dealing with data subjects (the persons) residing in the EU – even when the data processors and data controllers are outside of the EU.

Among the requirements of EU GDPR are aspects such as the right to be forgotten, the right to edit the PII stored about one self, or the “consent per purpose” principle, which requires informed consent per purpose of use of PII, in contrast to today’s typical “this site uses cookies and we will do whatever we want with the data collected” style of consent.

Notably, the definition of PII is very broad in the EU. It is not only about data that is directly mapped to the name and other identifiers. If a bit of data can be used to identify the individual, it is PII.

There are obvious effects to social networks, to websites where users are registered, and to many other areas of business. The EU GDPR also will massively affect the emerging field of CIAM (Consumer/Customer Identity and Access Management), where full support for EU GDPR-related features, such as a flexible consent handling, become mandatory.

However, will the EU GDPR also affect the traditional, on-premise IAM systems with their focus on employees and contractors? Honestly, I don’t see that impact. I see it, as mentioned beforehand, for CIAM. I clearly see it in the field of Enterprise Information Protection, by protecting PII-related information from leaking and managing access to such information. That also affects IAM, which might need to become more granular in managing access – but there are no new requirements arising from the EU GDPR. The need for granular management access to PII might lead to a renaissance (or naissance?) of Dynamic Authorization Management (think about ABAC) finally. It is far easier handling complex rules for accessing such data based on flexible, granular, attribute-based policies. We will need better auditing procedures. However, with today’s Access Governance and Data Governance, a lot can be done – and what can’t be done well needs other technologies such as Access Governance in combination with Dynamic Authorization Management or Data Governance that works well for Big Data. Likewise, Privilege Management for better protecting systems that hold PII are mandatory as well.

But for managing access to PII of employees and contractors, common IAM tools provide sufficient capabilities. Consent is handled as part of work contracts and other generic rules. Self-service interfaces for managing the data stored about an employee are a common feature.

The EU GDPR is important. It will change a lot. But for the core areas of today’s IAM, i.e. Identity Provisioning and Access Governance, there is little change.



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