Beyond Datacenter Micro-Segmentation – start thinking about Business Process Micro-Segmentation!

Sometime last autumn I started researching the field of Micro-Segmentation, particularly as a consequence of attending a Unisys analyst event and, subsequently, VMworld Europe. Unisys talked a lot about their Stealth product, while at VMworld there was much talk about the VMware NSX product and its capabilities, including security by Micro-Segmentation.

The basic idea of Datacenter Micro-Segmentation, the most common approach on Micro-Segmentation, is to segment by splitting the network into small (micro) segments for particular workloads, based on virtual networks with additional capabilities such as integrated firewalls, access control enforcement, etc.

Using Micro-Segmentation, there might even be multiple segments for a particular workload, such as the web tier, the application tier, and the database tier. This allows further strengthening security by different access and firewall policies that are applied to the various segments. In virtualized environments, such segments can be easily created and managed, far better than in physical environments with a multitude of disparate elements from switches to firewalls.

Obviously, by having small, well-protected segments with well-defined interfaces to other segments, security can be increased significantly. However, it is not only about datacenters.

The applications and services running in the datacenter are accessed by users. This might happen through fat-client applications or by using web interfaces; furthermore, we see a massive uptake in the use of APIs by client-side apps, but also backend applications consuming and processing data from other backend services. Furthermore, there is also a variety of services where, for example, data is stored or processed locally, starting with downloading documents from backend systems.

Apparently, not everything can be protected perfectly well. Data accessed through browsers is out of control once it is at the client – unless the client can become a part of the secure environment as well.

Anyway, there are – particularly within organizations with good control of everything within the perimeter and at least some level of control around the devices – more options. Ideally, everything becomes protected across the entire business process, from the backend systems to the clients. Within that segmentation, other segments can exist, such as micro-segments at the backend. Such “Business Process Micro-Segmentation” stands not in contrast to Datacenter Micro-Segmentation, but extends that concept.

From my perspective, we will need two major extensions for moving beyond Datacenter Micro-Segmentation to Business Process Micro-Segmentation. One is encryption. While there is limited need for encryption within the datacenter (don’t consider your datacenter being 100% safe!) due to the technical approach on network virtualization, the client resides outside the datacenter. The minimal approach is protecting the transport by means like TLS. More advanced encryption is available in solutions such as Unisys Stealth.

The other area for extension is policy management. When looking at the entire business process —and not only the datacenter part — protecting the clients by integrating areas like endpoint security into the policy becomes mandatory.

Neither Business Process Micro-Segmentation nor Datacenter Micro-Segmentation will solve all of our Information Security challenges. Both are only building blocks within a comprehensive Information Security strategy. In my opinion, thinking beyond Datacenter Micro-Segmentation towards Business Process Micro-Segmentation is also a good example of the fact that there is not a “holy grail” for Information Security. Once organizations start sharing information with external parties beyond their perimeter, other technologies such as Information Rights Management – where documents are encrypted and distributed along with the access controls that are subsequently enforced by client-side applications – come into play.

While there is value in Datacenter Micro-Segmentation, it is clearly only a piece of a larger concept – in particular because the traditional perimeter no longer exists, which also makes it more difficult to define the segments within the datacenter. Once workloads are flexibly distributed between various datacenters in the Cloud and on-premises, pure Datacenter Micro-Segmentation reaches its limits anyway.



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