Amazon opens data center in Germany

Today, AWS (Amazon Web Services) announced the opening of their new region, located in Frankfurt, Germany. The new facilities actually contain two availability zones, i.e. at least two distinct data centers. AWS can now provide a local solution to customers in mainland Europe, located close to one of the most important Internet hubs. While on one hand this is important from a technical perspective (for instance, with respect to potential latency issues), it is also an important move from a compliance perspective. The uncertainty many customers feel regarding data protection laws in countries such as Germany, as well as the strictness of these regulations, is a major inhibitor preventing the rapid adoption of cloud services.

Having a region in Germany is interesting not only for German customers, but also for cloud customers from other EU countries. AWS claims that, since they provide a pure-play IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) cloud service that just provides the infrastructure on which the VMs (virtual machines) and customers’ applications reside, their customers have full control over their own data, especially since the AWS Cloud HSM allows the customers to hold their encryption keys securely in the cloud. This service relies on FIPS 140-2 certified hardware and is completely managed by the customer via a secure protocol. Notably, the customer can decide on where his data resides. AWS does not move customer data outside of the region where the customer places it. With the new region, a customer can design a high availability infrastructure within the EU, i.e. Germany and Ireland.

KuppingerCole strongly recommends that customers encrypt their data in the cloud in a way that allows them to retain control over their keys. However, it must be remembered that the responsibility of the data controller stretches from end to end. It is not simply limited to protecting the data held on a cloud server; it must cover the on-premise, network, and end user devices. The cloud service provider (AWS) is responsible for some but not all of this. The data controller needs to be clear about this division of responsibilities and take actions to secure the whole process, which may involve several parties.

Clearly, all this depends on which services the customers are using and the specific use they make of them. Amazon provides comprehensive information around the data compliance issues; additional information around compliance with specific German Laws is also provided (in German). The AWS approach should allow customers to meet the requirements regarding the geographical location of data and, based on the possession of keys, keep it beyond control of foreign law enforcement. However, there is still a grey area: Amazon operates the hardware infrastructure and hypervisors. There was no information available regarding where the management of this infrastructure is located, whether it is fully done from the German data center, 24x7, or whether there is a follow-the-sun or another remote management approach.

Cloud services offer many potential benefits for organizations. These include flexibility to quickly grow and shrink capacity on demand and to avoid costly hoarding of internal IT capacity. In many cases, technical security measures provided by a cloud service provider exceed those provided on-premise, and the factors inhibiting a move to cloud services are more psychological than technical. However, any business needs to be careful to avoid becoming wholly dependent upon one single supplier.

In sum, this move by Amazon reduces the factors inhibiting German and other European customers from moving to the cloud, at least at the IaaS level. For software companies from outside of the EU offering their solutions based on the AWS infrastructure as cloud services, there is less of a change. Moving up the stack towards SaaS, the questions of who is doing data processing, who is in control of data, or whether foreign law enforcement might bypass European data regulations, are becoming more complex.

Hence, we strongly recommend customers to use a standardized risk-based approach for selecting cloud service providers and ensure that this approach is approved by their legal departments and auditors. While the recent Amazon announcement reduces inhibitors, the legal aspects of moving to the cloud (or not) still require thorough analysis involving experts from both the IT and legal/audit side.

More information on what to consider when moving to the cloud is provided in Advisory Note: Selecting your cloud provider - 70742 and Advisory Note: Security Organization, Governance, and the Cloud - 71151.



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