KuppingerCole Analysts' View on Operational Technology / Industry 4.0

grahamwilliamson.per.jpg    

Article

OT, ICS, SCADA – What’s the difference?

Graham Williamson

Operational Technology (OT) refers to computing systems that are used to manage industrial operations as opposed to administrative operations. Operational systems include production line management, mining operations control, oil & gas monitoring etc.

ot_ics_scada.jpg

Industrial control systems (ICS) is a major segment within the operational technology sector. It comprises systems that are used to monitor and control industrial processes. This could be mine site conveyor belts, oil refinery cracking towers, power consumption on electricity grids or alarms from building information systems. ICSs are typically mission-critical applications with a high-availability requirement.

Most ICSs fall into either a continuous process control system, typically managed via programmable logic controllers (PLCs), or discrete process control systems (DPC), that might use a PLC or some other batch process control device.

Industrial control systems (ICS) are often managed via a Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems that provides a graphical user interface for operators to easily observe the status of a system, receive any alarms indicating out-of-band operation, or to enter system adjustments to manage the process under control.

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems display the process under control and provide access to control functions. A typical configuration is shown in Figure 1 - Typical SCADA Configuration Figure 1.

scada_configuration.pg.jpg
Figure 1 - Typical SCADA Configuration

The main components are:

  • SCADA display unit that shows the process under management in a graphic display with status messages and alarms shown at the appropriate place on the screen. Operators can typically use the SCADA system to enter controls to modify the operation in real-time. For instance, there might be a control to turn a valve off, or turn a thermostat down.
  • Control Unit that attaches the remote terminal units to the SCADA system. The Control unit must pass data to and from the SCADA system in real-time with low latency.
  • Remote terminal units (RTUs) are positioned close to the process being managed or monitored and are used to connect one or more devices (monitors or actuators) to the control unit, a PLC can fulfil this requirement. RTUs may be in the next room or hundreds of kilometres away.
  • Communication links can be Ethernet for a production system, a WAN link over the Internet or private radio for a distributed operation or a telemetry link for equipment in a remote area without communications facilities.

There are some seminal changes happening in the OT world at the moment. Organisations want to leverage their OT assets for business purposes, they want to be agile and have the ability to make modifications to their OT configurations. They want to take advantage of new, cheaper, IP sensors and actuators. They want to leverage their corporate identity provider service to authenticate operational personnel. It’s an exciting time for operational technology systems.

mikesmall.per.jpg    

Article

Security and Operational Technology/Smart Manufacturing

Mike Small

Industry 4.0 is the German government’s strategy to promote the computerization of the manufacturing industry. This strategy foresees that industrial production in the future will be based on highly flexible mass production processes that allow rich customization of products. This future will also include the extensive integration of customers and business partners to provide business and value-added processes. It will link production with high-quality services to create so-called “hybrid products”.

At the same time, in the US, the Smart Manufacturing Leadership Coalition is working on their vision for “Smart Manufacturing”. In 2013 the UK the Institute for Advanced Manufacturing, which is part of the University of Nottingham, received a grant of £4.6M for a study on Technologies for Future Smart Factories.

This vision depends upon the manufacturing machinery and tools containing embedded computer systems that will communicate with each other inside the enterprise, and with partners and suppliers across the internet. This computerization and communication will enable optimization within the organizations, as well as improving the complete value adding chain in near real time through the use of intelligent monitoring and autonomous decision making processes. This is expected to lead to the development of completely new business models as well as exploiting the considerable potential for optimization in the fields of production and logistics.

However there are risks, and organizations adopting this technology need to be aware of and manage these risks. Compromising the manufacturing processes could have far reaching consequences. These consequences include the creation of flawed or dangerous end products as well as disruption of the supply chain. Even when manufacturing processes based on computerized machinery are physically isolated they can still be compromised through maladministration, inappropriate changes and infected media. Connecting these machines to the internet will only increase the potential threats and the risks involved.

Here are some key points to securely exploiting this vision:

  • Take a Holistic Approach: the need for security is no longer confined to the IT systems, the business systems of record but needs to extend to cover everywhere that data is created, transmitted or exploited. Take a holistic approach and avoid creating another silo.
  • Take a Risk based approach: The security technology and controls that need to be built should be determined by balancing risk against rewards based on the business requirements, the assets at risk together with the needs for compliance as well as the organizational risk appetite. This approach should seek to remove identifiable vulnerabilities and put in place appropriate controls to manage the risks.
  • Trusted Devices: This is the most immediate concern since many devices that are being deployed today are likely to be in use, and hence at risk, for long periods into the future. These devices must be designed and manufactured to be trustworthy. They need an appropriate level of physical protection as well as logical protection against illicit access and administration. It is highly likely that these devices will become a target for cyber criminals who will seek to exploit any weaknesses through malware. Make sure that they contain protection that can be updated to accommodate evolving threats.
  • Trusted Data: The organization needs to be able to trust the data from this. It must be possible to confirm the device from which the data originated, and that this data has not been tampered with or intercepted. There is existing low power secure technology and standards that have been developed for mobile communications and banking, and these should be appropriately adopted or adapted to secure the devices.
  • Identity and Access Management – to be able to trust the devices and the data they provide means being able to trust their identities and control access. There are a number of technical challenges in this area; some solutions have been developed for some specific kinds of device however there is no general panacea. Hence it is likely that more device specific solutions will emerge and this will add to the general complexity of the management challenges.

More information on this subject can be found in Advisory Note: Security and the Internet of Everything and Everyone - 71152 - KuppingerCole

Martin Kuppinger    

Comment

Safety vs. security – or both?

Martin Kuppinger

When it comes to OT (Operational Technology) security in all its facets, security people from the OT world and IT security professionals quickly can end up in a situation of strong disagreement. Depending on the language they are talking, it might even appear that they seem being divided by a common language. While the discussion in English quickly will end up with a perceived dichotomy between security and safety, e.g. in German it would be “Sicherheit vs. Sicherheit”.

The reason for that is that OT thinking traditionally – and for good reason – is about safety of humans, machines, etc. Other major requirements include availability and reliability. If the assembly line stops, this can quickly become expensive. If reliability issues cause faulty products, it also can cost vast amounts of money.

On the other hand, the common IT security thinking is around security – protecting systems and information and enforcing the CIA – confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Notably, even the perception of the common requirement of availability is slightly different, with IT primarily being interested in not losing data while OT looking for always up. Yes, IT also frequently has requirements such as 99.9% availability. However, sometimes this is unfounded requirement. While it really costs money if your assembly line is out of service, the impact of HR not working for a business day is pretty low.

While IT is keen on patching systems to fix known security issues, OT in tendency is keen on enforcing reliability and, in consequence, availability and security. From that perspective, updates, patches, or even new hardware and software versions are a risk. That is the reason for OT frequently relying on rather old hardware and software. Furthermore, depending on the type of production, maintenance windows might be rare. In areas with continuous production, there is no way of quickly patching and “rebooting”.

Unfortunately, with smart manufacturing and the increased integration of OT environments with IT, the risk exposure is changing. Furthermore, OT environments for quite a long time have become attack targets. Information about such systems is widely available, for instance using the Shodan search engine. The problem: The longer software remains unpatched, the bigger the risk. Simply said: The former concept of focusing purely on safety (and reliability and availability) no longer works in connected OT. On the other hand, the IT thinking also does not work. Many of us have experienced problems and downtimes to due erroneous patches.

There is no simple answer, aside that OT and IT must work hand in hand. It’s, cynically said, not about “death by patch vs. death by attacker”, but about avoiding death at all. From my perspective, the CISO must be responsible for both OT and IT – split responsibilities, ignorance, and stubbornness do not help us in mitigating risks. Layered security, virtualizing existing OT and exposing it as standardized devices with standardized interfaces appears being a valid approach, potentially leading the way towards SDOT (Software-defined OT). Aside of that, providers of OT must rethink their approaches, enabling updates even with small maintenance windows or at runtime, while enforcing stable and reliable environments. Not easy to do, but a premise when moving towards smart manufacturing or Industry 4.0.

One thing to me is clear: Both parties can learn from each other – to the benefit of all.

What are your thoughts on #Industry 4.0?

Join the discussion and share your comments
on KuppingerCole Blogs or on Twitter @KuppingerCole

Related KuppingerCole Research

Related KuppingerCole Podcasts

How can we help you

Send an inquiry

Call Us +49 211 2370770

Mo – Fr 8:00 – 17:00

Stay Connected

Subscribe to our Podcasts

KuppingerCole Podcasts - watch or listen anywhere

Spotlight

AI for the Future of Your Business Learn more

AI for the Future of Your Business

AI for the Future of your Business: Effective, Safe, Secure & Ethical Everything we admire, love, need to survive, and that brings us further in creating a better future with a human face is and will be a result of intelligence. Synthesizing and amplifying our human intelligence have therefore the potential of leading us into a new era of prosperity like we have not seen before, if we succeed keeping AI Safe, Secure and Ethical. Since the very beginning of industrialization, and even before, we have been striving at structuring our work in a way that it becomes accessible for [...]

News